Female Managers………………….

Originally posted on Kindadukish's Blog - I am not a number, I am a free man (The Prisoner):

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There are only three countries in the world where you are more likely to have a female than male boss, according to a new study by the International Labour Organisation: Jamaica, Colombia and Saint Lucia.

Britain comes in at number 41 out of 108 countries ranked according to their percentage of female managers, with 34.2 per cent.

The United States in number 15 on the list with 42.8 per cent while Algeria (4.9 per cent) and Pakistan (3.0 per cent) are at the bottom of the list.

Here are the 10 countries which have the highest percentage of female managers according to the International Labour Organisation:

1. Jamaica 59.3 per cent

2. Colombia 53.1 per cent

3. Saint Lucia 52.3 per cent

4. Philippines 47.6 per cent

5. Panama 47.4 per cent

6. Belarus 46.2 per cent

7. Latvia 45.7 per cent

8. Guatemala 44.8 per cent

9. Bahamas…

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Does your face fit a leadership position?

military_business_handshake_1600_wht_9795Broad-faced men are more aggressive and better at sport but in the military thin-faced men are more likely to rise up the ranks.

Scientist in Finland have been researching some WW2 archives relating to the “Winter War” in 1939-40 ( a great feat of arms by the  Finnish army resisting overwhelming soviet forces and well worth reading about).

The archives have details on almost 800 soldiers in three Finnish regiments including photographs, number of children, and the rank attained.

Wider-faced men tended to have more children but usually attained a lower military rank.

In men face shape is influenced by testosterone levels making it a proxy for evolutionary success hence the fact that generally speaking men with broader and shorter faces are more aggressive but less trustworthy.

The researchers point out that dominance in the military may be better predicted by leadership qualities otter than aggressiveness.The military relies on a strict hierarchy, which requires trust and fear of punishment to be maintained

See also “Take me to your leader

 

Empathy in business

phone_talk_bubble_1600_wht_12346A survey by a campaigning agency aimed at improving women’s access to technology has identified the worst and best companies on its “empathy index”.

The empathy index scored 100 companies on the way they treat both staff and customers by using a poll of 1,000 members of the public, on-line feedback from 25 employees from each company, and an analysis of a company’s last 100 tweets.

The telecoms industries came out the worst with the big four companies in the bottom 10 on their empathy ratings.

RyanAir, Carphone Warehouse and BT have been labelled as the companies that never listen. Carphone Warehouse was accused of “giving retail a bad name” with customers facing  “nauseating hard sells from teenagers” and queues reminiscent of Soviet Russia.

Twitter has more than 500 million users but came 8th from bottom and was criticised as ” a textbook example of how not engage on social networks” because of its robotic, boring and repetitive messages (which I’ve tweeted about before).

Selfridges came out 87th. Apparently the satisfaction you get as a customer is not matched by the experience of working there. “All glamour but no empathy”.

Pret a Manger came in about half-way with an “at best mediocre” scores on customer satisfaction and employee relations.

They found that the most empathetic companies in Britain were LinkedIn and Microsoft. Both were praised for making customers and employees feel valued and for resolving consumer problems within seconds on twitter.

However other technology companies fared less well. Facebook, with more than 1 billion users, only achieved 48th place and was described as “the brand that was too big to listen”. Staff working for Facebook, and twitter, described them as providing good career opportunities and work-life balance.

Amazon, the world’s biggest retailer, was just the opposite. Customers love it but its employees hate it.

And Apple only made 43rd place and was accused of “refusing to engage” on social media.

John Lewis came 5th even though it ignores criticism on social media. Other companies in the top 10 include Audi, Three, Sony, Google, Nike, Direct Line, and Boots. 

Stuck in the bottom quartile were all the main banks with RSB being branded “the least trusted bank in the UK“. Lloyds bank employees “believe they have limited career opportunities” and Barclays has  “a very poor perception among customers“. Well no wonder is it after their behaviour in recent years.

HSBC however came out in 22nd position and was named the most empathetic bank.

 

Women ‘blocked from boardrooms’…………..really?

Originally posted on Kindadukish's Blog - I am not a number, I am a free man (The Prisoner):

Nearly one in five women believe it is almost impossible for a female to reach a senior management role in business, according to a report. In a survey of 2,000 working women by communications giant 02, half replied that all the decision-makers in their company were male.

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A review into diversity has recommended that 25% of company boards should be made up of women, but the report said progress towards meeting the target was not moving fast enough.

More than a quarter of those polled said they dreamed of becoming a chief executive, but a third said they had failed to meet their career expectations, blaming poor quality line management, a lack of training and negative office politics.

Women said good luck often led to success in business, rather than skill, ambition or determination. Ann Pickering, O2’s HR director and board member, said: “As an employer, today’s findings make for uncomfortable reading. We…

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Using technology to predict leavers

pulled_in_two_directions_1600_wht_3783Once upon a time it was thought that employees who started taking more shirt-term absences from work were possibly thinking of leaving.

It was assumed that they were bored, disaffected, or going for interviews. When jobs were plentiful this group of employees were more likely to leave sooner rather than later. When jobs were scarce they hung on being disruptive through their absences.

Now, according to a report in The Times, companies such as Joberate are developing software using so-called “big data” to help them predict which employees are unhappy and likely to leave.

Indicators include opening a LinkedIn account, or spending Friday afternoons on twitter following other companies, or looking at job postings on FaceBook. But the state of the recruitment market and company performance can also be factored in.

Joberate compares an employee’s social media activity with a previous base-line and when it changes can notify the company, or a head-hunter, of the possibility that this person might be in the job market.

All the data they use is publicly accessible so can be accessed without the individual’s permission. Perhaps a stark reminder of being careful about what you put in the pubic domain.

However another software programme Workday uses internal company data such as promotions, management decisions, job cuts and satisfaction surveys.

Companies apparently think that once they have identified employees who might be at risk of moving they can intervene and persuade them to stay.

I’m not so sure. Once people start on activities such as LinkedIn job profiles they are already distancing themselves psychologically from their organisation (and probably more likely to take time off).

And usually people leave because of a poor relationship with their immediate boss.

One piece of research based on 32,000 Fortune 100 companies found that from the time an employee had a bad meeting with their boss it took only three months for that person to resign.

by BizPsycho

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