Category Archives: Management

Farewell Smith Guttridge & Associates

waving_goodbye_oval_sign_PA_500_wht_4550I’ve decided it’s time to hang up my laptop and take a well-earned break from work.

Working with associates at Smith Guttridge has been wonderful; such a buzz working with creative, passionate people who all believed in doing the very best they could for clients (and helping each other at the same time).

So I’ll be spending more time on my music project, photography and family (not necessarily in that order).

I’ll still be writing my Bizpsycho blog over at bizpsycho.com as well as other lifestyle stuff.

I’m planning to transfer some of the posts from here to Bizpsycho and leave this blog up until the registration expires.

So thanks to everyone who took the trouble to read this. My blog was read in 111 countries but primarily in the USA, the UK, and Spain.

But thank you those readers from Papua New Guinea, Uzbekistan, Iceland, Moldova, Qatar, Guernsey, Luxemburg, Afghanistan, Macao, Tanzania and Kyrgyzstan among others.

Truly an international readership. Any blogger will tell you how much they appreciate an audience.

 

 

Too many e-mails plus bad management stressing out staff

laptop_mail_PA_500_wht_2109Professor Sir Cary Cooper has hit out at the avalanche of e-mails most workers now suffer from at work.

In a speech at the British Psychology Conference in Liverpool he said UK productivity was the second lowest in the G7 group of nations (20% below the average and 40% below the USA) which he believed was due to our embracing technology “too enthusiastically”.

He thinks companies should shut down their servers to discourage employees from checking e-mails in the evening and at weekends and especially when on holiday – which he described as sick. (Some companies are already doing this in Germany).

He would like to ban in-house e-mails between members of staff in favour of face-2-face communication and thought c.c. e-mails a waste of time.

He thinks too may people are just showing up for work (“Presenteeism“) but not doing anything productive.

Research at the University of Sussex confirms that when when staff are given company smartphones they put in an extra day a week checking and responding to e-mails.

Experts say that there may be help round the corner from even newer technology such as Slack and Yammer which provide an open stream of communications not requiring you to open e-mails. (Is that really an improvement?)

employee_diciplined_1600_wht_5635But it’s not all down to the technology. British managers are notoriously poor at praising and encouraging staff. Cooper likens a good boss to a parent figure balancing criticism and praise.

However UK employees don’t have to wait long to be criticised in his view but they can wait a long time to get any praise for good work. And that could be a problem with younger workers who expect praise and good treatment at work.

 

Female Managers………………….

Kindadukish's Blog - I am not a number, I am a free man (The Prisoner)

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There are only three countries in the world where you are more likely to have a female than male boss, according to a new study by the International Labour Organisation: Jamaica, Colombia and Saint Lucia.

Britain comes in at number 41 out of 108 countries ranked according to their percentage of female managers, with 34.2 per cent.

The United States in number 15 on the list with 42.8 per cent while Algeria (4.9 per cent) and Pakistan (3.0 per cent) are at the bottom of the list.

Here are the 10 countries which have the highest percentage of female managers according to the International Labour Organisation:

1. Jamaica 59.3 per cent

2. Colombia 53.1 per cent

3. Saint Lucia 52.3 per cent

4. Philippines 47.6 per cent

5. Panama 47.4 per cent

6. Belarus 46.2 per cent

7. Latvia 45.7 per cent

8. Guatemala 44.8 per cent

9. Bahamas…

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Women ‘blocked from boardrooms’…………..really?

Kindadukish's Blog - I am not a number, I am a free man (The Prisoner)

Nearly one in five women believe it is almost impossible for a female to reach a senior management role in business, according to a report. In a survey of 2,000 working women by communications giant 02, half replied that all the decision-makers in their company were male.

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A review into diversity has recommended that 25% of company boards should be made up of women, but the report said progress towards meeting the target was not moving fast enough.

More than a quarter of those polled said they dreamed of becoming a chief executive, but a third said they had failed to meet their career expectations, blaming poor quality line management, a lack of training and negative office politics.

Women said good luck often led to success in business, rather than skill, ambition or determination. Ann Pickering, O2’s HR director and board member, said: “As an employer, today’s findings make for uncomfortable reading. We…

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Using technology to predict leavers

pulled_in_two_directions_1600_wht_3783Once upon a time it was thought that employees who started taking more shirt-term absences from work were possibly thinking of leaving.

It was assumed that they were bored, disaffected, or going for interviews. When jobs were plentiful this group of employees were more likely to leave sooner rather than later. When jobs were scarce they hung on being disruptive through their absences.

Now, according to a report in The Times, companies such as Joberate are developing software using so-called “big data” to help them predict which employees are unhappy and likely to leave.

Indicators include opening a LinkedIn account, or spending Friday afternoons on twitter following other companies, or looking at job postings on FaceBook. But the state of the recruitment market and company performance can also be factored in.

Joberate compares an employee’s social media activity with a previous base-line and when it changes can notify the company, or a head-hunter, of the possibility that this person might be in the job market.

All the data they use is publicly accessible so can be accessed without the individual’s permission. Perhaps a stark reminder of being careful about what you put in the pubic domain.

However another software programme Workday uses internal company data such as promotions, management decisions, job cuts and satisfaction surveys.

Companies apparently think that once they have identified employees who might be at risk of moving they can intervene and persuade them to stay.

I’m not so sure. Once people start on activities such as LinkedIn job profiles they are already distancing themselves psychologically from their organisation (and probably more likely to take time off).

And usually people leave because of a poor relationship with their immediate boss.

One piece of research based on 32,000 Fortune 100 companies found that from the time an employee had a bad meeting with their boss it took only three months for that person to resign.

My most read business posts in 2014

dscf1285.jpgOnce again the techies at WordPress provide me with an annual report with lots if statistics. They remind me I posted a measly 47 posts last year, and some of them I re-blogged – so thank you bloggers who allowed me to do that.

My blog is now read in 111 countries but primarily in the USA, the UK, and Spain. But thank you those readers from Papua New Guinea,  Uzbekistan, Iceland, Moldova, Qatar, Guernsey, Luxemburg, Afghanistan, Macao, Tanzania and Krygystan among others. Truly an international readership.

The top ten posts were:

1st : Stress back on the agenda? This was 4th last year and in the top spot in 2012

2nd: Teams and Diversity not so simple which was in 5th spot last year

3rd: Women are the winners at work which was in top spot last year

4th: Saying thank you makes good business sense a jump from 16th place last year

5th: Leadership & Influencing and even bigger jump from 21st spot last year

6th: No-one wants to be rated as average This was 3rd last year and in 2nd spot in both 2011 & 2012 – obviously I struck a chord with it.

7th: Erotic Capital – boobs, botox and making the most of yourself a slight drop from 6th spot last year

8th: Rude, arrogant and powerful up from 11th spot last year

9th: Leaders without any shame jointly with Leadership capabilities necessary for a successful merger

10th: Women in Leadership – too nice? Too bossy?

For the second year my most-read posts have been from earlier years with only those in bottom three places from 2014. This probably reflects the paucity of my output in 2014. So must try harder!

My most read posts in 2013